Rocking Out With Your Wireless Phone

If you’re like many people, your cell phone doesn’t just ring, it sings. In fact, thousands of people download musical ringtones to their cell phones each day-but what many of them don’t know is that they can listen to actual tunes right on their handsets.

Sound like music to your ears? You’re not alone. In fact, recent RadioShack survey found that nearly 60 percent of young adults said they want their wireless phones to have the ability to play music. Try these tips for getting music on your cell phone from the wireless experts at RadioShack.

The Satellite Radio Connection

The latest multimedia wireless phones from Sprint let you listen to SIRIUS satellite radio from your handset. For instance, RadioShack carries number of satellite radio-enabled phones, including the A900 by Samsung and the 8300 by Sanyo. The phones have stereo-quality speakers and come with headphones. Available satellite channels include:

o Sirius Hits 1: Today’s Top 40 Hits

o The Pulse: Pop and rock from the ’90s until now

o ’60s Vibrations: The musical revolution of the ’60s and early ’70s

o Totally ’70s: The most popular music from the ’70s

o Big ’80s: The hit music of the ’80s

o Classic Vinyl: Classic rock of the ’60s and ’70s

o Alt Nation: The best alt-rock of the ’90s and today

o Hot Jamz: Today’s hip-hop and R&B hits.

Tuning In

iTunes users can check out the Motorola ROKR from Cingular Wireless. The phone lets you listen to your favorite songs while text messaging, taking pictures or checking e-mail. If an incoming call comes while the music’s on, you can just hit “pause” and talk away. Here’s how to use the phone:

o Install the included iTunes desktop software.

o Connect the phone to your PC or MAC.

o Drag and drop up to 100 songs-pick the songs you want or let iTunes do it for you.

o Use the iTunes key on your phone to access your music.

o Shuffle songs or select song, artist or playlist-just like iTunes.

Album art accompanies the menu interface, allowing users to scroll through playlists and shuffle songs from the main menu.

Advertainment is Sneaking Into Music, Movies, TV and More

The very name “advertainment” sends thrilling vibrations up the spine of anyone with marketing in their blood or communication in their genes. And it produces a strong shiver of disgust from many of my colleagues in the music industry.

“I don’t want my songs to be involved in advertising,” they say, forgetting entirely that by wearing branded running shoes, a t-shirt hawking Fender guitars and a baseball cap emblazoned with the Peavey logo, their very lives are involved in advertising. Plus, if they attend an awards show, they happily state the brand and designer names of everything they’re wearing.

They further ignore the fact that radio itself is a form of advertainment. What gets played has little to do with musical accomplishment or artistic merit, but is directly related to the backing of large corporate distributors. I have been told to budget anywhere from a quarter of a million dollars to $350,000 in promotional costs to obtain national radio play on (the appropriately-named) commercial radio stations. Is it any wonder that corporations are seeking ways to build a little brand awareness into the songs?

Turn on any rap, urban or hip hop station and you can start counting the product mentions in the lyrics, some paid-for, some just happenstance. In the electronic-pop field, I have done it myself. On my “Electro Bop” album are songs such as “Paranormal Radio” (which begins as a documentary about American Technology Corporation’s HyperSonic Sound system), “Sheena Sez” (about talk radio host Sheena Metal), and “Check the Tech” (about the joys of watching the TechTV channel).

Has this advertisement hurt acceptance of the album? Not that I’ve noticed. Many e-mails from around the world cite “Paranormal Radio” as their favorite track. Not one person has complained about the ad messages, I assume because the audience for my dance-oriented music is pleased to receive information about technology and a far-out rock-talk jock such as Ms. Metal.

Ads and entertainment go hand-in-wallet in many other ways, some pretty strange. In music alone, we have all wondered about Bob Dylan’s “Love Sick” in Victoria’s Secret commercials (not to mention Mr. D himself smirking between shots of the lovely bodies wearing the lingerie). But don’t overlook Keith Richards in the “Cover Girl” ad while “Honky Tonk Women” plays, or Willie Nelson’s “Red Headed Stranger” in the Herbal Essence spot, or Iggy Pop’s liquor/drug/sex-soaked “Lust for Life” blasting throughout the Royal Caribbean commercials. (Love to work with the Account Executive who was able to sell that concept!) By contrast, Sting crooning from the back seat of a Jaguar seems a very model of demographic compatibility.

And that’s the point: ads and public relations are routinely dismissed as silly, annoying, intrusive or a waste of time right up to the moment when they are delivering facts the reader or listener wants. Then, suddenly, the sponsored message is viewed as helpful and instructive. Therefore, the trick is to achieve the right match between audience and message.

One problem is choosing your media. Just listing advertising outlets can be daunting: TV, radio, outdoor, newspapers, magazines, transit, direct mail, Internet banner. Many of these have subsets: paid inserts (advertorial) in newspapers and magazines, sponsored “newsbreaks” and infomercials on broadcast media, static or animated announcements at stadia, those dreaded ‘Net pop-ups, brand names on sports uniforms and equipment (can you say NASCAR?), etc.

One of the most enjoyable categories for producers of both music and advertising is viral ‘Net marketing, which has had some notable success stories such as BMW Films, the Seinfeld AmEx campaign, and of course, Burger King’s Subservient Chicken.

We haven’t even considered cooperative advertising, which can be anything from myriad logos at the bottom of an event poster to the branded music tones and flashing-light Intel trademark that ends every other commercial for someone else’s computer products.

But it extends further. Consider: Magazines that sell cover stories; product placement in movies and TV (and yes, live theater); branded clothing; bumper stickers; even fliers stuck on parked cars. There are ad messages on private automobiles (and those anti-humanistic trucks that some insist are called SUVs). Pull up behind a vehicle in traffic and you can read an ad for the car dealership on the license plate frame, plus another piece of public relations for the state on the plate itself. (Come on, you don’t think it’s hype to put “Land of enchantment” on every vehicle licensed in the state of New Mexico?)

You might think that this plethora of options makes it easier for firms to get their messages across to their targeted demographics, but a good case can be made for the opposite view. TV audiences are turning to Tivo and pay-per-view. Radio audiences are discovering XM and Sirius Satellite Radio. Newspaper readership is becoming an oxymoron. Motion picture audiences can be heard groaning, mocking or booing the pre-feature commercials.

This means there are a lot of people working on new ways to get the product benefits into the brains of the consumers. I do it with humorous radio scripts and subliminally seductive music, but there are going to be some innovations in our industry, and at the risk of appearing foolish, I’m going to make a few predictions. Within the next few years, we’ll see:

* Debit card scanners in TV sets, so you can order during a commercial with the flick of your remote.

* Barcodes in songs, so you can download from iTunes by swiping your XM or Sirius player with your Visa or MasterCard.

* Credit cards built into wristwatches, so your “plastic money” is always close at hand.

* Links to product sites in every scene of DVD movies or computer games. Do you want the shoes in the Tony Hawk Pro Skater game? Click-click-click and they’re on their way to you via FedEx (note product placement for the big competitor to United Parcel Service).

* Broadcasts of infotainment and advertisement will pop up everywhere: in public restrooms, at the Starbucks, at traffic signals, at the gas pump, on your mailbox, in the packages you purchase, in the parcels that arrive at your door, etc.

* Captive broadcasts. Just as you can preview the music on packaged CDs (available in EU now, but coming soon to the USA), the product benefits, price points and warranty information will play as soon as you lift up a product in the store.

* Digitized logo placement in the rebroadcasts of syndicated TV shows (“Hey, we can sell the product placement another three times!”)

* Branded ingredient lists on menus.

* Corporate artwork that takes you on a virtual tour of the company.

* Interactive ads, where you get to play Jerry Seinfeld and/or Superman (or the driver of the BMW) in a five-minute escape from reality (and from reality TV).

* Holographic projections of commercials from postage stamps, car and house keys, magazine covers and ad pages, etc.

And these are just the changes we’ll be seeing in the next few years. We’re not even discussing the opportunities for advertisement once we move beyond traditional broadcast methodology; when microchips are embedded under your skin, YOU will be the receiver for TV, radio, satellite, telephone, and global positioning system signals. And at that point, the possibilities for marketing communication via advertisement are going to become truly mind-boggling.

Are these prospects exciting, frightening, or both? My view is positive. After all, a lot of these new forms of communication are going to need my scripts and my music.

Do you love music? Then you are likely to be interested in this piece of news: discover who is the best 2018 pop artist here: https://www.camrynmusic.com/best-new-artist

How to Market and Sell Your Beats

Selling beats and licensing music can be a very lucrative business for someone with a significant amount a tracks. The problem that many composer and producers face is that not enough of the right people are hearing your music. Most beat selling website of are mainly used by other producers trying to sell their beats. Stock music and production sites have thousands of composers and producers that you have to compete with to be heard. Even if you get heard you have to give up half of your earning if you sell anything. These sites will present you with different promotion techniques that are designed to make them money not you. All of the promotion you have to do on beat selling and stock music sites you can do it yourself from your own website. This does not mean that you should not use beat selling sites. The more places you have your beats the more likely you are to sell them.

You have to look at your beats as a product. Software companies have their own websites but they sell their software in as many places as they can. This the way you should sell your beats. Here are a few tips for marketing your beat site.

1. Make hot beats, this has to be said because some producers just don’t get it.

2. Post as many YouTube videos as you can, post your music on any website that allows individuals to view your music.

3. Blog, blogging with leave backlinks to your site and will establish you as an expert.

4. Release instrumental albums, many producers do not understand that there is a huge market for instrumental music. Particularly new age and jazz. But many electronic musicians and some hip hop artist can release instrumental albums because DJs love them. Just go through a digital distributor and you can have your music on iTunes in no time.

5. Participate in forums, please do not try to sell your beats on the forums it will be considered spam. Stay on the topic and leave a link to your website. If you appear knowledgeable people will click on your link. Forums will also leave backlinks to your website.

6. Use social networking sites such as face book, my space and tweeter. These sites have hundreds of millions of users and will in able to you to develop a following.

7. Use site like Yahoo groups, participate in groups and start your own. This will allow to you communicate with artist, leave backlinks to your site and show your level of knowledge.

There are many ways to market you beats and your website, these are just a few to tips to get you

How To Get Unlimited Music MP3 Downloads Instantly

Ever wondered how to get unlimited music MP3 downloads? Music lovers probably have asked the same question many times. There are of course dozens of websites that talk about them but not everyone has the luxury to find out and look through the tons of information. The aim of this article is to show you how to find unlimited MP3 downloads and yet do so affordably in the simplest way possible. You will also discover more hot tips about MP3 music downloads.

Unlimited music MP3 downloads can be found at online music stores like iTunes for iPod, and other stores like HMV, Walmart and more. These are music giants and have some of the largest offerings in the world. Though they do not exactly have unlimited music MP3s, their collection often go in the range of millions of songs, music videos, sound tracks, music etc. Normally, it would cost you about 99 cents or below to download per music or song.

Nowadays, some music stores have taken the level of competition a bit further by offering monthly or even yearly memberships. Several offer a limited number of music MP3 downloads while others let you download unlimited number of music MP3 files. This move has totally revolutionized the way music downloads are previously handled. Needless to say, when you can access millions of music MP3 downloads for a small one-time fee, you would be downloading music online whenever you are free. You also need not think twice whether you should download this song or that since you can download both and all.

Everyday, it is estimated that tens of millions of music MP3 downloads take place around the world from these music download sites. Now that we know that there are places to download music MP3s for a lifetime fee, it is best that we also learn how to find a great site to download. There are a few important questions you need to ask before you decide.

1. How many different music genres does the music MP3 download site have?

If I were you, I would subscribe for a music MP3 download site with as many music genres as possible. Your taste for music may change with time. Today, you might like J-pop, tomorrow, it could be hip hop or even classical instrument pieces.

2. How much does it cost to get unlimited music MP3 downloads?

There are music sites that offer lifetime memberships for a one-time price. With this choice, there is no need to go with monthly plans. But even for one-time fee, never go for anything above $50. In fact, the rates nowadays are so reasonable that you can easily grab one that costs you below $40.

3. What are the usage rights for the songs you download?

Not all sites are the same for unlimited music MP3 downloads. Several membership sites allow you to download and burn the music onto CD to be played on other devices while there are others which restrict you to downloading onto your digital player only. Save the trouble by joining sites that give you no-restriction rights.

Once these three questions are properly answered, you would have found the ideal site for unlimited music MP3 downloads. To quicken the whole process, visit my music blog and see for yourself which are the best places for unlimited music MP3 downloads.